Revolution Makers, Gaza – Onadekom

اناديكم صناع الثورة – البصمة العربية Onadekom (Calling You Palestine – Syria)


Revolution Makers Gaza

Palestine (The Song) Written by FREEDOM singer Matt Jones

Written by Matt Jones, Freedom Singer

matt-jones

Vocals: Luci Murphy
Piano: Steve Jones

Lyrics:

“Palestine” Written by Matt Jones (ASCAP)

Chords: G-C-D

If you think of the Middle East,
in this modern time
You can’t help but say the word:
Palestine

People there have lost their land
some have lost their home
They live in other countries,
their Freedom almost gone

(Chorus)
Palestine needs her Freedom
Palestine needs our Love
Palestine needs her Freedom
Palestine needs our Love

There seems to be no answer
to give us the reason why
people cannot live
so no one has to die

Take a stand for Freedom
take a stand for Truth
take a stand for Justice,
that’s what we’ve gotta do, cuz…

(Chorus)

People there are rich,
people there are poor
some have education,
so what are they fighting for?

Fighting for their Freedom,
fighting for their land
fighting for their Children
let’s help them take a stand

(Chorus)

People of all countries,
of every race and creed
we need a new beginning,
let us plant the seed

Plant the seed of Love,
and let that loveseed grow
Plant the seed for everyone,
so all the World will know…

(Chorus)

April 14, 2014 • Posted in: Latest News • 3 Comments

This Divestment Bill Hurts My Feelings

Remi Kanazi – This Divestment Bill Hurts My Feelings

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Remroum
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/RemiPoet
Website: http://www.PoeticInjustice.net
Booking/Media: Booking@PoeticInjustice.net

Poem by Remi Kanazi
Video by Suhel Nafar
Audio by Andrew Felluss


This Divestment Bill Hurts My Feelings

this divestment bill
hurts my feelings

that Caterpillar bulldozer
ended life in the body of
an American citizen. drove
her bones into the ground while
a company cashed in on the sale

the claws of D-9 bulldozers unearth
the livelihood of occupied Palestinians
uprooting their crops and cemeteries
to make way for illegal settlements

but we need a positive
campus climate

while HP’s stock rises on division
producing technology to segregate
Palestinians. Biometric ids at checkpoints
equipment. enhancing the naval blockade
of an open air prison

Palestinians on campus listen to words
like climate, positive, hurt feelings
knowing their tuition invests in companies
reigning terror on loved ones
that suffering, like their voices
is non-existent to student board members
looking for cushy jobs at top 5 law firms

but this divestment bill
is divisive

the Montgomery bus boycott, divisive
the grape boycott, one sided
abolishing slavery, radical
Nelson Mandela, a terrorist
indigenous, savages
women’s suffrage, complicated
desegregation, provocative
Hiroshima, security
internment camps, a necessity
bantustans, autonomy
Iraq, liberation
Palestine, barren

there is always an excuse
catch phrases, talking points
strip away names and faces
we are being militant, unreasonable
there is context to this oppression

the word apartheid, it makes
you feel uncomfortable?

it is apartheid by definition
fits the ‘73 convention
by law, it is a crime
against humanity

two sets of laws
for two people
labor, land ownership
access to education

50 laws of discrimination
46 years of occupation
27,000 homes demolished
nearly a million arrested
since ‘67

whoa! whoa! whoa!
every nation has problems
but why the singling out on campuses?

you mean like…
Darfur, Tibet, South Africa
sweatshops, Coca Cola
animal testing, the Keystone Pipeline
undocumented rights
the prison industrial complex
fossil fuels, teacher’s unions
university cuts and bottled water?
the real question
why are you singling out
any injustice for protection?

let me get the next one for you
Israel is democratic
democratic
like coal is clean
Miller Lite is the same great taste, less filling
and McDonald’s salads are healthy

these are not imagined scenarios
our tuition dollars are profiting off of death
divestment is the next step

this is not about a nation or a people
but what is being done to people
in our names, with our currency
this university will not liberate anyone
but it can choose to cease
making a buck off of misery
vote Yes for divestment
No to appeasement
affirming injustice
isn’t positive
for any climate

Mohammed Hassona – We Are Hope For Freedom (Gaza, 2013)

MohammedHassona_WeAreHopeForFreedom

Mohammed Hassona , Graphic Designer and Blogger, Gaza, Occupied Palestine – http://im7mad.wordpress.com

Qalandiya – Photograph by Samar Hazboun

Qalandiya Refugee Camp, Occupied Palestine. Photograph © Samar Hazboun

Qalandiya Refugee Camp, Occupied Palestine. Photograph © Samar Hazboun

Roger Waters Announces BDS Support

From the statement ‘My Journey to BDS’ by Roger Waters, March 7th 2011:

In 1980, a song I wrote, “Another Brick in the Wall Part 2,” was banned by the government of South Africa because it was being used by Black South African children to advocate their right to equal education. That apartheid government imposed a cultural blockade, so-to-speak, on certain songs, including mine.

Twenty-five years later, in 2005, Palestinian children participating in a West Bank festival used the song to protest Israel’s apartheid wall. They sang “We don’t need no occupation! We don’t need no racist wall!” At the time, I hadn’t seen first-hand what they were singing about.

A year later in 2006, I contracted to perform in Tel Aviv.

Palestinians from the movement advocating an academic and cultural boycott of Israel urged me to reconsider. I had already spoken out against the wall, but I was unsure whether a cultural boycott was the right way to go. The Palestinian advocates of a boycott asked that I visit the occupied Palestinian territory, to see the Wall for myself before I made up my mind. I agreed.

Under the protection of the UN I visited Jerusalem and Bethlehem. Nothing could have prepared me for what I saw that day. The Wall is an appalling edifice to behold. It is policed by young Israeli soldiers who treated me, a casual observer from another world with disdainful aggression. If it could be like that for me, a foreigner, a visitor, imagine what it must be like for the Palestinians, for the underclass, for the passbook carriers. I knew then that my conscience would not allow me to walk away from that Wall, from the fate of the Palestinians I met, people whose lives are crushed daily in a multitude of ways by Israel’s occupation. In solidarity, and somewhat impotently, I wrote on their wall that day: “We don’t need no thought control.”

Realizing at that point that my presence on a Tel Aviv stage would inadvertently legitimize the oppression I was witnessing, I canceled my gig at the football stadium in Tel Aviv and moved it to Neve Shalom an agricultural community devoted to growing chick peas and also, admirably, to cooperation between people of different faiths, where Muslim, Christian and Jew live and work side by side in harmony.

Against all expectations, it was to become the biggest music event in the short history of Israel. 60,000 fans battled traffic jams to attend. It was extraordinarily moving for me and my band, and at the end of the gig I was moved to exhort the young people gathered there to demand of their government that they attempt to make peace with their neighbors and respect the civil rights of Palestinians living in Israel.

Sadly in the intervening years, the Israeli government has made no attempt to implement legislation that would grant civil rights to Israeli Arabs equal to those enjoyed by Israeli Jews, and The Wall has grown, inexorably, illegally annexing more and more of The West Bank.

I had learned that day in Bethlehem in 2006 something of what it means to live under occupation, imprisoned behind a Wall. It means that a Palestinian farmer must watch olive groves centuries old, uprooted. It means that a Palestinian student cannot get to school because the checkpoint is closed. It means a woman may give birth in a car, because the soldier won’t let her pass to the hospital that’s a ten minute drive away. It means a Palestinian artist cannot travel abroad to exhibit work, or to show a film in an international film festival.

For the people of Gaza, locked in a virtual prison behind the wall of Israel’s illegal blockade, it means another set of injustices. It means that children go to sleep hungry, many chronically malnourished. It means that fathers and mothers, unable to work in a decimated economy, have no means to support their families. It means that university students with scholarships to study abroad must watch the opportunity of a lifetime slip away because they are not allowed travel.

In my view, the abhorrent and draconian control that Israel wields over the besieged Palestinians in Gaza, and the Palestinians in the occupied West Bank (including East Jerusalem), coupled with its denial of the rights of refugees to return to their homes in Israel, demands that fair minded people around the world support the Palestinians in their civil, nonviolent resistance.

Where governments refuse to act, people must, with whatever peaceful means are at their disposal. For some that meant joining the Gaza Freedom March, for others it meant joining the humanitarian flotilla that tried to bring much needed humanitarian aid to Gaza.

….read more at IMEU.net]

Roger Waters performs “We Shall Overcome” with G.E. Smith and Thor Jonsson

Video: Miguel Nogueira

Honoring the work of Juliano Mer Khamis



Freedom Theatre, Jenin.

63 Years of Occupation


From Youtube: “To reply to the Gaza youth Manifesto, and with no additional words to the ones spoken with true heart on this video, we give you, The Manifesto. A simple, true, self-explanatory, expression of what we’re sick of.

As these days mark the 63rd memory of the Nakba, our people all around the world, revolt, and object to the injustice and hatred we are met with on a day to day basis, just because we’re Palestinians and just because we exist.

I urge your humanity and your conscience, to spread on this video, so the 15th of May 1948, wouldn’t ever be forgot, and so Palestinians would once more have their freedom and rights back; especially the right of return.

Salamat,
Two randoms from Palestine.”


Remi Kanazi: This Poem Will Not End Apartheid

Remi Kanazi is a poet, writer, and activist based in New York City. He is the editor of Poets For Palestine (Al Jisser Group, 2008). His political commentary has been featured by news outlets throughout the world, including Al Jazeera English, GRITtv with Laura Flanders, and BBC Radio. His poetry has taken him across North America, the UK, and the Middle East, and he recently appeared in the Palestine Festival of Literature as well as Poetry International. He is a recurring writer in residence and advisory board member for the Palestine Writing Workshop.

Remi Kanazi is an Artist Against Apartheid.

Ana Hurra on Tour in USA

Ana Hurra (I am free) is a play that depicts one of the interrogation sessions in Israeli jails. The play, written and directed by Palestinian artist Valantina Abu Oqsa, is based on testimonies and stories by political female prisoners who stood heroically in defiance against their interrogators. Abu Oqsa creates a theatre experience that is derived from the Palestinian reality through studies and in-depth research that lasted almost one year and culminated in interviews with several former Palestinian male and female political prisoners, documenting the experiences to the tiniest detail, delving into the unknown and revealing facts, constituting a precedent in the Palestinian theater and for the Palestinian prisoners in general.

Originally from the North of Palestine, Ma’lia village in the upper Galilee. Valantina Saleem Tamam Abu Oqsa was born in 1967. She currently lives in Haifa with her Jerusalemite husband and their two sons Nashed and Yaman. She is one of the co-founders of the Palestinian Theatre League.

Classified as a self starter who is exceptional in her work.  She continuously rises in her magnificent performances on stage, leaving her audience mesmerized and always wanting more.

Click here for Tour Details

US TOUR: OCTOBER 7-23, 2011

A PROJECT OF THE US PALESTINIAN COMMUNITY NETWORK

TOUR SCHEDULE + SUPPORT THE TOUR

October 7, 8 and 9 shows: Tickets now on sale for San Bruno and Berkeley!

October 14 show: Tickets now on sale in New York City!

October 21 show: New details on Detroit, Michigan show!

Click here for Tour Details

October 8, 2011 • Tags: , , • Posted in: Theatre • 3 Comments

Creative Community for Peace and Apartheid

Boycott The Creative Community for Peace

Artists Against Apartheid calls on allies to boycott the Creative Community for Peace (CCFP), which is in fact a complicit propaganda institution seeking to normalize Israeli apartheid and strongarm entertainers into its service. Fearing encroaching pressure from the Palestinian led global BDS movement, CCFP has mobilized to counteract the cultural boycott of Israel, making itself a target of the human rights campaign in the process.

Capitalizing on ignorance, the CCFP proudly calls Israel “the only democracy in the region“ surrounded by states known for their human rights violations, while offering no solutions to any human rights violations anywhere in the Middle East. Of course CCFP does not acknowledge the human rights violations being carried out daily by the Israeli state throughout Palestine-Israel.

One of CCFP’s founders, Steve Schnur, wants artists to know “what Israel is really about – the freedom, the democracy and equal rights”, but CCFP does not acknowledge that more than 30 laws racially discriminate against Palestinians and anyone the state does not deem to be “Jewish”.

CCFP wishes to make the claim that “art transcends politics” but is engaged heavily in political propaganda on behalf of an apartheid state. The only artist known to be included in CCFP’s advisory board is Idan Raichel, a self-proclaimed cultural ambassador who stated: “We certainly see ourselves as ambassadors of Israel in the world, cultural ambassadors, hasbara ambassadors, also in regards to the political conflict.”

CCFP uses its hierarchical influence within the entertainment industry to prevent artists from arriving at the logical conclusion: that a state which privileges certain citizens based on racial and religious identity is an apartheid state. CCFP advisor David Renzer boasts about their steering of Macy Gray’s decision “One of our main messages to her was: ‘Look, Macy, you’re not a politician; you’re an artist. One of the beautiful things about an artist is that when she performs, she spreads the message of love, peace and understanding and an open dialogue. That won’t happen if you cancel.” Mr. Renzer does not contextualize that Palestinian artists living under Israeli military rule cannot so easily spread a message of peace even a few miles without encountering an IDF tank, nor would they have been able to attend Macy Gray’s concert. Palestinians seeking equal rights and justice are calling for Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions, not imported entertainment.

CCFP, which seeks to normalize Israel’s “cultural achievements” while ignoring its ongoing colonial practices and innate structural racism, is a prime candidate for cultural boycott. As indicated in guidelines from the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel, “rebranding” efforts aimed at diluting, justifying, whitewashing or otherwise diverting attention from the Israeli occupation and other violations of Palestinian rights and international law deserve to be boycotted for their complicity in serving the purposes of Israel’s colonial and apartheid regime.

The cultural boycott of Israel, as a key component of the global BDS Movement, shall be maintained until Israel meets its moral and legal obligation to recognize the Palestinian people’s inalienable right to self-determination by:

1. Ending its occupation and colonization of all Arab lands and dismantling the Wall;

2. Recognizing the fundamental rights of the Arab-Palestinian citizens of Israel to full equality; and

3. Respecting, protecting and promoting the rights of Palestinian refugees to return to their homes and properties as stipulated in UN resolution 194.

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Mary Tuma – Homes For The Disembodied

marytuma_homesforthedisembodied
Homes For the Disembodied - Artist Mary Tuma

Artist’s Statement:

Homes for the Disembodied is a large-scale suspended sculpture made from 50 continuous yards of black chiffon folded to create five connected dresses similar in form to the dresses traditionally worn by the women of Palestine. It was created for exhibition at the Al Wasiti Art Center in East Jerusalem in the year 2000. Homes for the Disembodied is both a memorial to and an offering for the people displaced from Jerusalem who were unable to return to their homes before their deaths. That the dresses are actually one piece is significant and speaks to the link that binds the Palestinian people through a shared misfortune. The dresses are lined up facing a single direction, as if waiting in line or moving together. The heroic scale reflects the strength and courage of Palestinian women who must carry on in unjust circumstances they have little power to change.

“To be more specific about the piece’s relationship to what is happening today, and to the apartheid issue in particular: Palestinians are still restricted from travel to Jerusalem, even if that was their home until 1967. Currently even more travel restrictions apply, so that there are Israeli checkpoints between Arab villages within the occupied territories as well as checkpoints between the occupied areas and Israel. These checkpoints are meant to create impossible situations for the Palestinians, to disempower them and to control every breath they take. The reasoning behind such control is, of course, Israeli security, however the presence of the many checkpoints within the territories attests to the false nature of this explanation. The piece is meant to point out the lack of access to the city of Jerusalem, the so-called open city.” - Mary Tuma

Dear Red Hot Chili Peppers

Dear Red Hot Chili Peppers,

As you may be aware, Palestinians seeking freedom, justice and equality are engaged in non-violent resistance to over 64 years of Israel’s apartheid, ethnic cleansing, and colonialism. A broad coalition of Palestinian civil society groups are leading the global campaign of Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) against apartheid Israel, joined by Israeli and international activists.

We as artists can act in coordination with this global movement by understanding the call for cultural boycott. To challenge Israel’s robotic use of the arts to smokescreen its human rights violations, the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel (PACBI) asks artists everywhere to help deprogram it. Specifically, the campaign asks that:

As was done in the case of South African apartheid, please join us now in the cultural boycott of Israel, and help stop entertaining apartheid. For more information about the cultural boycott as it relates to artists, please visit: http://declaration.artistsagainstapartheid.org

Signed,
Artists Against Apartheid

[download PDF]


The Red Hot Chili Peppers performed in the 2011 Hoping Foundation variety show in London, an event which raised over £392,000  for the group’s activities for Palestinian refugee children. A petition urging that the Red Hot Chili Peppers cancel their upcoming performance, slated for September 10th 2012, has over 2300 signatures: http://t.co/ufiQUZUO

May 1, 2012 • Tags: , • Posted in: Cutural Boycott • 6 Comments

Thank You Stevie Wonder

Stevie This letter is issued in response to the announcement in Y-net News that Stevie Wonder is booked to perform at the annual gala of the Friends of the Israel Defense Forces (FIDF) organization, Thursday, December 6, Los Angeles. FIDF is an institution complicit in maintaining Israeli apartheid. The performance has been cancelled.

November 28th, 2012

Dear Stevie Wonder,

As you may be aware, Palestinians seeking freedom, justice and equality are engaged in non-violent resistance to over 64 years of Israel’s apartheid, ethnic cleansing, and colonialism. A broad coalition of Palestinian civil society groups are leading the global campaign of Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) against apartheid Israel, joined by Israeli and international activists.

We as artists can act in coordination with this global movement by understanding the call for cultural boycott. To challenge Israel’s robotic use of the arts to smokescreen its human rights violations, the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel (PACBI) asks artists everywhere to help deprogram it. Specifically, the campaign asks that:

As was done in the case of South African apartheid, please join us now in the cultural boycott of Israel, and help stop entertaining apartheid. For more information about the cultural boycott as it relates to artists, please visit: http://declaration.artistsagainstapartheid.org

Signed,

Artists Against Apartheid


Download PDF
Take Action: Sign the Petition organized by the US Campaign to End the Israeli Occupation

Jerry Dammers Speaks About Artists Against Apartheid

http://www.wltx.com/video/3582853760001/1/INTERVIEW—Jerry-Dammers-on-his-recognition-Nelson-Mandela-Artists-Against-Apartheid-and-the-economy-at-the-Ivor-Novello-Awards-2014-at-The-Grosvenor-House-Hotel-on-May-22-2014-in-London-England

INTERVIEW – Jerry Dammers on his recognition, Nelson Mandela, Artists Against Apartheid and the economy at the Ivor Novello Awards 2014 at The Grosvenor House Hotel on May 22, 2014 in London, England.

INTERVIEW – Jerry Dammers on his recognition, Nelson Mandela, Artists Against Apartheid and the economy at the Ivor Novello Awards 2014 at The Grosvenor House Hotel on May 22, 2014 in London, England.


December 4, 2014 • Tags: , , • Posted in: Cutural Boycott • No Comments

Austin Artists Against Apartheid Declaration

aaaatxcover

Austin Artists Against Apartheid is an alliance of artists based in Austin, TX who are committed to promoting justice, equal rights for all people, and the eradication of apartheid in our world. We are affiliated with the international alliance, Artists Against Apartheid. Our main mission is to spread awareness about the plight of the Palestinian people through art and culture, and to educate other artists about how to use their platforms to promote peace and justice.

DECLARATION:

The “crime of apartheid” is defined as acts “committed for the purpose of establishing and maintaining domination by one racial group of persons over any other racial group of persons and systematically oppressing them” (International Convention on the Suppression and Punishment of the Crime of Apartheid, 1973).

While crimes of apartheid are ongoing in Palestine-Israel, we will stand in solidarity with the call from Palestinian civil society for Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS), and specifically the Cultural Boycott of Israel:

1. We support the call for international artists not to perform or exhibit work in apartheid Israel, unless in solidarity with anti-apartheid events.

2. We will not perform, exhibit, or otherwise participate in events sponsored by the state of Israel or institutions complicit in its apartheid.

3. We will not perform, exhibit or otherwise participate in events which deceptively suggest symmetry or shared responsibility between “both sides” for Israel’s ongoing colonial oppression of the Palestinian people and its system of apartheid.

The cultural boycott of Israel, as a key component of the global BDS Movement, shall be maintained until Israel meets its moral and legal obligation to recognize the Palestinian people’s inalienable right to self-determination by:

1. Ending its occupation and colonization of all Arab lands and dismantling the Wall;

2. Recognizing the fundamental rights of the Arab-Palestinian citizens of Israel to full equality; and

3. Respecting, protecting and promoting the rights of Palestinian refugees to return to their homes and properties as stipulated in UN resolution 194.

In solidarity,
Austin Artists Against Apartheid

May 29th, 2014

September 27, 2014 • Tags: , • Posted in: BDS, Chapters • No Comments

Palestinian Arts Organizations Stand With PACBI and Against War Crimes

21/07/2014
Statement by Palestinian performing art organizations
17th July 2014

We, cultural workers representing the majority of Palestinian performing art organizations, condemn the current Israeli attack and aggression on Gaza, and the indiscriminate killing and maiming of mainly civilians, among them many children and women.
As artists, the most powerful weapon we have is our ability to play, dream and imagine. The oppressive forces fear this weapon because as long as we are able to imagine another kind of reality, we have the power to pursue it – a free and just Palestine.
Israel is portraying the ongoing massacre in Gaza as a war between them and Hamas, as part of an obnoxious media campaign of turning the oppressed into the villains. This latest Israeli attack against Gaza is a crime that must be understood within the context of Israeli occupation and apartheid. For over six decades Palestinians have been systematically bereaved of their lands, their water and their freedom of movement. Settlements continue to be built, a wall is erected on occupied lands and Gaza has been under a suffocating blockade for over six years. These crimes must be condemned and acted upon immediately.
Among our companions are institutions that despite all the hardships continue to work in Gaza, using music, theatre and drama to comprehend, process, educate and mobilize. We stand with them and we ask you to do the same.
While governments are once again turning their backs, people around the world are raising their voices; taking to the streets and refusing to let the people of Gaza suffer in silence. We urge our colleagues, friends and partners not to stay silent and join us in our protest.
We call upon the world to put pressure on Israel to stop the blockade of Gaza.
We particularly call upon our fellow artists and cultural organizations to condemn the current aggressions against Gaza and the occupation of Palestine through petitions, protests and statements. Further to that, we urge you to act by supporting the Palestinian cultural and academic boycott of Israel (PACBI), thereby refusing to be complicit in the ongoing occupation and apartheid.
Together, we can turn hopelessness into determination and the forces of division into unity. It is within our power.

The undersigned, as founding members of the Palestinian Performing Art Programme (PPAN)

Al-Harah Theatre: www.alharah.org

The Magnificat Association: www.magnificat.custodia.org

The Edward Said National Conservatory of Music: http://ncm.birzeit.edu/en

Al Kamandjati Association: www.alkamandjati.com

Theatre Day Productions: www.theatreday.org

Yes Theatre: www.yestheatre.org

The Palestine Circus School: www.palcircus.ps

The Freedom Theatre: www.thefreedomtheatre.org

Popular Art Center: http://www.popularartcentre.org/

El Funoun Dance Troupe: www.el-funoun.org

Ashtar Theatre: www.ashtar-theatre.org

A.M Qattan Foundation: http://www.qattanfoundation.org/en/

August 5, 2014 • Posted in: BDS, Cutural Boycott • No Comments

Nelson Mandela – The Special AKA

R.I.P. Nelson Mandela

Dear Alicia Keys

aliciakeysboycottisraeliapartheid

Saturday February 23rd, 2013


Dear Alicia Keys,

As you may be aware, Palestinians seeking freedom, justice and equality are engaged in non-violent resistance to over 64 years of Israel’s apartheid, ethnic cleansing, and colonialism. A broad coalition of Palestinian civil society groups are leading the global campaign of Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) against apartheid Israel, joined by Israeli and international activists.

We as artists can act in coordination with this global movement by understanding the call for cultural boycott. To challenge Israel’s robotic use of the arts to smokescreen its human rights violations, the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel (PACBI) asks artists everywhere to help deprogram it. Specifically, the campaign asks that:

As was done in the case of South African apartheid, please join us now in the cultural boycott of Israel, and help stop entertaining apartheid. For more information about the cultural boycott as it relates to artists, please visit: http://declaration.artistsagainstapartheid.org

Signed,
Artists Against Apartheid

…………………………………………………..

Update: Alice Walker open lettter to Alicia Keys

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aliciakeysboycottisraeliapartheid13